THE CLOTHES

What is it about Chic Jack’s Vintage Clothing that keeps customers coming back? It’s the uniqueness and quality of our clothing and, of course, our knowledgeable and friendly staff! But we sell much more than clothing and a tremendous array of accessories for both men and women … We sell history! Check out the decades pages, shown at left, to get a taste of the fashion, history and unique shopping experience that awaits you!

THE 1920’S

THE 1920’S

The ’20s sparked both a fashion and social revolution. As the stock market soared, so did spirits and hemlines. Gone were the very staid fashions of the Victorian era. Talking movies, jazz clubs and rolled down stockings — showing flashes of newly revealed rouged kneecaps — were now the order of the day. With a sense of victory from winning the right to vote, ladies danced the night away in silk velvet frocks with dropped waistlines and often plunging necklines. In the wee hours, they donned their silk brocade shawl-collared coats and accessorized with intricately beaded evening bags.

 It was a feel-good time. Any boy could grow up to be President, any girl could be the next big Hollywood star, and fashions reflected this. Luxurious fabrics became more accessible to the middle class, and we saw the birth of rayon.

 Entrepreneurial businesses boomed, leading to more leisure time — and leisure clothing. On the golf course, it was “knickers” and fine linens or cotton sweaters for men. And no well-dressed lad would take his best girl on a picnic unless he was sporting his boater. Yes, it was a magical time … until the bottom dropped out of the American stock market, and the world economy plunged.
 

THE 1930’S

THE 1940’S

THE 1950’S

THE 1960’S

THE 1960’S

Truly a starkly split decade! The early ’60s still saw the glamour of the ’50s with the installation of Jackie Kennedy as our new First Lady. Chanel, Balenciaga and Oleg Cassini, were just some of the fabulously elegant designers that gained national recognition. Every girl wanted to look and dress like Jackie. But then an invasion took place: a British invasion spearheaded by the Fab Four. The Beatles took this country and, indeed, the world, by storm; with the new style in fashion. Collarless suits, Edwardian suits, narrow pants and skinny ties were the rage for guys. So was long hair. For the first time in centuries, guys wore high-heeled boots, lace and velvet.

  For girls, hemlines went up — way up — and kept right on going. The mini skirt was born. Empire-waist dresses were the rage in a way we hadn’t seen since Napoleon and Josephine were an item. Wide-wale corduroys, hip-huggers and everything in polyester, from shirts to the leisure suit, was in vogue. The Vietnam war brought its own changes in fashion and culture: The anti-war movement brought with it military clothing for both guys and gals. The end of the ’60s saw the beginning of more of this paramilitary clothing and bell bottoms, which were once exclusively the domain of the young, became mainstream.
 

THE 1970’S

THE 1970’S

We see a continuation of a fashion and cultural change that saw the release of tremendous creative energy. Hemlines were like hairstyles: fabulously long or incredibly short. Annie Hall’s wardrobe became the one to emulate. Vidal Sassoon became a household word. Rudi Gernreich raised eyebrows with his creation of the topless bathing suit. Psychedelic music gave way to psychedelic patterns for fashion. Macramé, platform shoes, jumpsuits, hotpants, bodysuits, cool boots, and the fashion and cultural influence of India were seen in love beads, buffalo sandals and fabrics. Hukapoo and Nik-Nik shirts were the rage, and, thanks to “Landlubber” jeans, bell bottoms became elephant bells. Denim everything, especially if it was stone washed, always stylish as was anything military. Pucci became a fashion icon, and we “let it all hang out.” And the influence of fashions of Liza, Andy and everyone else at Studio 54 was strong enough to last to this day.

THE 1980’S

THE 1980’S

In this decade, we see somewhat of a fashion backlash — sort of a semi-return to elegance. Cottons once again became king, although some polyester still remained so that spandex could have its stretchiness, and rayon had more versatility and strength. It was the era of big hair and big shoulders for women. From the cities to the suburbs, women packed on the shoulder pads for the “Dynasty” look, or tartan and boat shoes for the preppy look.

 Hemlines were either at the knee or calf, and leg o’mutton sleeves were seen in dresses and blouses. Skinny jeans and bell-bottoms were out, only to be replace by high-waisted pleated jeans, designer jeans (Sergio Valente, anyone?) and pleated pants, bolo ties and cowboy boots. Guys were always well dressed in their Members Only jackets, small collared shirts and acid-washed jeans. Daring ones even wore colored jeans and parachute pants. For the more elegant look, double-breasted suits and vests were in style, along with an array of much wider ties.
 

VINTAGE

VINTAGE

At Chic Jack’s, we take pride in our ability to preserve what amounts to wearable history for our many customers. Shopping in our store, one might find in pristine condition a military frock coat worn by one of Andrew Jackson’s troops during the War of 1812. Coming forward in time, again we find Civil War era military coats and original cotton hoop skirts that were worn by any Scarlett O’Hara of the 1860’s.

The late Victorian era conjures visions of ladies with “leg o’mutton”-sleeved tops and coats, dotted Swiss shirtwaists, and “shimmies”—straw hats with flowing ribbons billowing on a summer breeze. Men of the same era donned their frock coats if they wanted to look well-groomed enough to impress the ladies. This was the era of laces, eyelets and silk velvets … an era of fine metal-mesh wrist purses for the ladies and beaver fur stove-top hats for the men. Come to Chic Jack’s Vintage Clothing and touch history. Try it on, and let your imagination carry you back in time.